Seattle District Header Image

SEATTLE DISTRICT

Home
Home > Media > Images

Image Gallery

Next Last
Flood teams from the Seattle District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, will initiate work today on the Turah Levee in Missoula County, Montana. The $161,550 project is designed to stabilize and protect the levee by repairing a 150-foot scour hole.
Turah Levee
5/20/2018 1:57:00 PM
Flood teams from the Seattle District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, will initiate work today on the Turah Levee in Missoula County, Montana. The $161,550 project is designed to stabilize and protect the levee by repairing a 150-foot scour hole.
Turah Levee
5/20/2018 1:57:00 PM
Flood teams from U.S. Army Corps of Engineers strengthened a section of the Lost River levee in Mazama, Wash.
Lost River
5/19/2018 5:37:00 PM
Seattle District's Tim Warren, Cathie Desjardin and Charles Ifft pose for a photograph in Tallahassee, Florida. They are deployed as an Infrastructure Assessment Team where they are managing water and waste water treatment plant assessments as well as other technical assistance requests. The District, has so far deployed 13 technical experts to support both Hurricane Irma and Hurricane Harvey recovery efforts.
Seattle District assists hurricane recovery efforts
9/15/2017 5:15:00 PM
Mud Mountain Dam typically does not hold a pool when not being used for flood control.  Operation of Mud Mountain Dam for flood control held back inflow of about 22,500 cfs to 6,000 cfs outflow during the peak of the floods. While inflows have now dropped substantially, the public should be prepared for continued high outflows in the near future as dam operators release stored water to make room in the reservoirs for potential future high inflows. While releases from Mud Mountain Dam are expected to stay below the official flood stage of 8,000 cfs, the Corps will periodically monitor conditions today in the Pacific and Sumner areas on the White River because of the unpredictability of channel capacity there.
Mud Mountain Dam typically does not hold a pool
12/10/2015 4:25:00 PM
Operation of Mud Mountain Dam for flood control held back inflow of about 22,500 cfs to 6,000 cfs outflow during the peak of the floods. While inflows have now dropped substantially, the public should be prepared for continued high outflows in the near future as dam operators release stored water to make room in the reservoirs for potential future high inflows. While releases from Mud Mountain Dam are expected to stay below the official flood stage of 8,000 cfs, the Corps will periodically monitor conditions today in the Pacific and Sumner areas on the White River because of the unpredictability of channel capacity there.
Mud Mountain Dam hold back flood waters
12/10/2015 4:24:00 PM
While releases from Mud Mountain Dam are expected to stay below flood stage of 8,000 cfs, the Corps has levee walkers in the Pacific and Sumner area to monitor conditions because of the unpredictability of channel capacity there. Inflows to the dam have been as high as 21,000 cfs, and the Corps has held flows below flood stage to reduce impacts downstream to the extent possible.
Corps river spotters monitor flood conditions on White River
12/9/2015 6:49:00 PM
Doug Weber, Seattle District Emergency Management chief, was called to South Carolina as a subject matter expert in infrastructure assessment. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Headquarters, has been tasked to assess 652 non-federal dams to determine the extent of damages following recent flooding there. Weber is also working with the Federal Emergency Management Agency to develop a wastewater treatment facility assessment plan. There are 74 wastewater treatment plants that have reported flood damage. The Corps also completed an Unmanned Aerial System mission, which is the first time the UAS has been used by USACE for a FEMA mission. The photo shows those who have come together from across the country to support the mission in the South Carolina state-run Emergency Operations Center.
Seattle District sends emergency management expert to assist with damage assessments following South Carolina flooding
10/13/2015 12:43:00 PM
Next Last